Apr 04, 2020  
2019-2020 Graduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Graduate Catalog

Basic Responsibilities


Introduction

Although the University provides information, assistance, advisement, and counseling to students through the publications of numerous departments and offices, the ultimate responsibility for complying with the requirements for the degree and with the regulations of the University rests with the student. Students should read the catalog, the Departmental Program Policy Statement, and other information provided by the department and the University. If students have questions about a requirement or regulation, they should seek the answer through the instructional department or the Office of Graduate and Professional Education. Students should not wait for some authority within the University to inform them that they have not fulfilled a requirement or complied with a regulation.

The University of Delaware extends to qualified graduate students the privilege of attendance. The expectation is that they will put forth a genuine effort academically. Their conduct and citizenship at all times both on and off-campus must reflect credit upon the University and its student body. Students may be suspended or terminated for academic or disciplinary reasons if officers of the University determine that they are not profiting by attendance or that such action is not in the best interests of the University. Graduate students are required to abide by the Code of Conduct as published in the Student Guide to University Policies available online at www.udel.edu/stuguide/current. Graduate students accused of a violation of the Code of Conduct are subject to a hearing procedure and disciplinary action under the Graduate Student Judicial System.

It is the policy of the University of Delaware that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, or veteran status.

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty and integrity lie at the heart of the educational enterprise. Students are expected to do their own work and neither to give nor to receive assistance during quizzes, examinations, or other class exercises. One form of academic dishonesty is plagiarism. Students are urged to consult individual faculty members for explanation of procedures for taking tests, writing papers, and completing other course requirements so that students may fully understand their instructor’s expectations. Because faculty and students take academic honesty seriously, penalties for violations may be severe, depending upon the offense as viewed by the Graduate Student Judicial System.

Responsible Computing

Use of the University’s extensive computing resources for course assignments, research projects, email, and access to information resources available on the Internet is a privilege. Students must abide by the policies and procedures governing the use of these resources. Under the Policy for Responsible Computing (www.udel.edu/ExecVP/polprod/1-14.html), all students must assume responsibility for the integrity of these resources, respect the rights of other users, and abide by all relevant laws and contractual obligations.

To educate students about secure and appropriate computer use, the University has initiated a number of campaigns including the following:

  • “The Code of the Web” conveys the importance of the many issues related to responsible computing (www.udel.edu/codeoftheweb/).
  • “No Excuses” educates students about the legal implications of downloading and sharing materials that hold copyright protection (www.udel.edu/legaltunes).
  • “Protecting Personal Non-public Information (PNPI)” encourages strategies that students should use to protect their personal information as well as activities that help protect against identity theft (www.udel.edu/pnpi).

Students alleged to violate the Policy for Responsible Computing (www.udel.edu/ExecVP/polprod/1-14.html) are subject to full disciplinary action within the Student Judicial System, up to and including loss of computing privileges, suspension, or expulsion. Questions about responsible computing may be directed to the IT Help Center at (302) 831-6000.

In addition, the owner of a computer that is identified as sharing copyrighted material risks prosecution for violation of copyright laws. File sharing of copyrighted material is illegal. A student who is identified as violating copyright laws will, among other penalties, have their network connection terminated for at least 30 days, and the case will be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs. For more information about copyright abuse, see (www.udel.edu/security/copyright_abuse.htm).

Anti-virus Software

If a computer is not running up-to-date anti-virus software, it can become infected with computer viruses. These viruses threaten the security of the campus network. UD has a site license for McAfee anti-virus software, which can be obtained free (udeploy.udel.edu). McAfee software must be installed on any computer that connects to the campus network. This version of McAfee is automatically updated when a computer is connected to the network, providing continued protection from future virus infection. Students should also be checking for and deleting spyware at least once a week. See (www.udel.edu/security) for more information about how to protect your computer from viruses and spyware.

Computer Clean-up Policy

A student who brings a compromised computer to Information Technologies-User Services (IT-US) to be cleaned of viruses, adware, spyware, peer-to-peer (P2P) software, and other software that pose risks to the campus network will be charged $70 for the first cleaning and $100 for subsequent cleanings. The fee will be charged to the student’s account and will appear on the student’s bill. The fees collected for the computer clean-up service will go towards expanding the University’s educational efforts and resources to help make students aware of their responsibilities to keep their computers and the campus network running securely.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

Brief Description of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 grants to students certain rights, privileges, and protections relative to individually identifiable student education records which are maintained by the University. Specifically:

  1. Students’ education records (with the exception of directory information) will be released to third parties outside the University only with the written consent of the student. The University reserves the right to release education records to appropriate parties in a health or safety emergency or when the student’s well-being is of concern.
  2. Students have the right to inspect their own personally identifiable education records. The right may be exercised by completing a request form at the service desk of the University Visitors Center.
  3. Students have the right to challenge information contained in personally identifiable education records. The procedure is described in the Annual Notification of Rights printed below.

Directory Information

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act permits the release of directory-type information to third parties outside the institution without written consent of the student provided the student has been given the opportunity to withhold such disclosure

The University releases, upon inquiry by third parties outside the University, directory information without written consent of the student. Directory information includes name, address, telephone number, college, class, major, dates of attendance, and degree, honors, and awards conferred. Students may withhold directory information by contacting the Registrar’s Office or by changing privacy settings through UDSIS.

Annual Notification of Rights under FERPA for Postsecondary Institutions (2012)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution.) These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days after the day the University of Delaware receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the school official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the school to amend a record should write the school official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested, the school will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to provide written consent before the University discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The school discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University of Delaware in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the University of Delaware who performs an institutional service of function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the school with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent or a student volunteering to assist another school official in performing their tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill their professional responsibilities for the University of Delaware.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Delaware to comply with the requirements of FERPA. For more information, see www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-02/pdf/2011-30683.pdf. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202

   5. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act permits the release of directory-type information to third parties outside the institution without written consent of the student provided the student has been given the opportunity to withhold such disclosure.

The University of Delaware releases, upon inquiry by third parties, outside the University, directory information without written consent of the student. Directory information includes name, address, telephone number, college, class, major, dates of attendance, and degree, honors and awards conferred. Students may withhold directory information by contacting the Registrar’s Office or by changing privacy settings through UDSIS.

Disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information (PII)

  • FERPA permits the disclosure of PII from students’ education records, without consent of the student, if the disclosure meets certain conditions found in §99.31 of the FERPA regulations. Except for disclosures to school officials, disclosures related to some judicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas, disclosures of directory information, and disclosures to the student, §99.32 of FERPA regulations requires the institution to record the disclosure. Eligible students have a right to inspect and review the record of disclosures. A postsecondary institution may disclose PII from the education records without obtaining prior written consent of the student -
  • To other school officials, including teachers, within the University of Delaware whom the school has determined to have legitimate educational interests. This includes contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions, provided that the conditions listed in §99.31(a)(1)(i)(B)(1) - (a)(1)(i)(B)(2) are met. (§99.31(a)(1))
  • To officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer, subject to the requirements of §99.34. (§99.31(a) (2))
  • To authorized representatives of the U. S. Comptroller General, the U. S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or State and local educational authorities, such as a State postsecondary authority that is responsible for supervising the university’s State-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of Federal- or State-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§99.31(a)(3) and 99.35)
  • In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. (§99.31(a)(4))
  • To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction. (§99.31(a)(6))
  • To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. ((§99.31(a)(7))
  • To parents of an eligible student if the student is a dependent for IRS tax purposes. (§99.31(a)(8))
  • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (§99.31(a)(9))
  • To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency, subject to §99.36. (§99.31(a)(10))
  • Information the school has designated as “directory information” under §99.37. (§99.31(a)(11))
  • To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of §99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. (§99.31(a)(13))
  • To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of §99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. (§99.31(a) (14))
  • To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. (§99.31(a)(15))